favorite
favorite
hide
unhide
flag

Posted

print

For gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings - $45 (memphis)

For gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 1 thumbnailFor gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 2 thumbnailFor gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 3 thumbnailFor gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 4 thumbnailFor gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 5 thumbnailFor gallery;Prints of exotic cars from original paintings 6 thumbnail
Fine artist specializing in exotic cars in search of brick and mortar gallery or antique store in Memphis that wants to try out 11"x 17" prints to see if here's any interest. The shop can choose both price and commission. If that's a success, we can move up to canvas giclees..I sold two 20" x 30" canvas prints for an average of $1000 ea. at Mecum Monterey 2022 Aris can be texted at phone np. shown.
auto
Read about the artist here: Old Cars Artist Spotlight: Wallace Wyss
Wallace Wyss has channeled his passion for Ferraris and European automobiles into works of art.
OLD CARS WEEKLY APR 20, 2024

By Lita Makati

Some artists get a s-l-o-w start, explains Wallace Wyss (rhymes with “Reese") Back in 1962 he enrolled in art classes at Wayne State in Detroit but when an ad agency hired interns a year later he snapped up a job as copywriter.

Flash forward several decades, Wyss is taking his 16th car book to the Beverly Hills car show so he decides to make a painting of Shelby, featured in the book (a previous one on Shelby sold 50,000 copies) . At the show, he sold the book and showed the buyer a picture of the painting. The buyer said "Go get it--you sold that too."

But it took years of experimenting with paint (he decided on acrylics) and a style (still painting on various styles of paper before he begins to make a final painting of a car).

A one-time member of the Ferrari Owners Club (he bought a ratty Ferrari from a movie producer) he specializes in Italian cars.

Wyss' love of Ferraris is quite evident in his work.
Wyss' love of Ferraris is quite evident in his work.

Bizzarrini, a little known flash in the pan, is his favorite-- because he first glimpsed one in 1968 in Detroit and coincidentally is going to make another portrait of it more than a half century later.


Still a photojournalist, he annually treks to Monterey for Car Week where he has a booth with his wife Angelita, selling his books (now all out of print) and his paper prints and giclee canvases.

Since some of the shows he attends as a journalist have prewar cars, an offshoot subject is art deco, or streamline moderne, cars, "That was my second oil sale," he recalls, "--a Delahaye--for the owner of the Mullin Museum, a museum devoted entirely to prewar French cars… He has an offshoot category of those cars."

He used to shoot pictures at racing events like the Monterey Historics but schlepping cameras and long lenses around became too much, now he just goes to car events with two or three point-and-shoot cameras, trying to remember to crouch so the cars don't look too high from his 6-foot frame.

His method of approaching a painting is to carefully enlarge his favorite picture from each event up to 11" x 17" and use carbon paper to transfer the skeletal outline to the painting surface. Then once he does a rough, he prints it on one kind of paper, then corrects it, prints it on another type of paper, taking sometimes five or six runs. All the paper is from Kelly and his favorite is "linen" which actually looks like linen cloth. Then if he has a paper print he really likes is selected for a giclee print, gallery wrapped (canvas wrapped around the wood frame). His favorite giclee size is 20" x 30" but he can be persuaded to go larger. He then embellishes. "To some artists an embellishment is a dab here or there--with me it's painting the whole picture again atop the print."

Only on the cases of commissions is he persuaded to change the background. "One guy with a Jag XK120 wanted Wimbledon stadium in the background because his daughter competed there," he said "then there's been requests for castles and mountains."

Ferrari-Car-Painting
Though he seldom has people in his work he's trying to wean away from static cars-on-a-lawn narratives. “Cars are about people," he says. He plans to include more people in his compositions in the future.

The car show route has become stagnant for him lately, but in August 2022, he came upon a stroke of luck after consigning two giclees of Ferraris to Mecum at Monterey as road art. "I had thought road art was gasoline globes, or kiddies pedal cars. And I thought their audience was muscle cars compared to tonier operations like RM Sothebys or Gooding. But they accepted them and the day I delivered my work, I saw they had Ferraris and Lamborghinis too,"

His Ferrari engine portrait sold for $900 and his portrait of a '60s Ferrari race car for over $1000. "I was blown away--who would have thought there were Ferrari fans at the Mecum?" He consigned them at no reserve. "It was nail biting because a bidder could buy it at one dollar," but I'm glad I took the chance."


This early Gmund Porsche (356 built at their original factory in Gmund Austria) was in bright sunlight so I didn't want to portray it fully lit as the background might distract so I painted the background then added my Monterey fog...
This early Gmund Porsche (356 built at their original factory in Gmund Austria) was in bright sunlight so I didn't want to portray it fully lit as the background might distract so I painted the background then added my Monterey fog...

Wallace Wyss

The black Bugatti (wedding present for the Shah in'39) I chose to set in Paris at night with a lot of mist enshrouding it. Car is realistic but background more fantasy.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

post id: 7754590993

posted:

best of [?]

loading
reading
writing
saving
searching